Greek Lamb and Roast Potatoes

Greek Lamb and Roast Potatoes

The idea of Greek lamb and roast potatoes takes me back to Athens in 2004 when we were invited to a friend’s wedding there.  Michalis was working on his PhD with me in the UK and very kindly invited Jackie and I to his wedding which was a spectacular affair!  Before the wedding though we had some time with Michalis and his family.  On one day before the wedding his mum cooked lamb and roast potatoes – and they were very special – soft roast potatoes full of meat juices and hinted with lemon, perfectly reflecting the meat – fabulous!    When we found a recipe that looked as though it was going to deliver something along the same lines I was excited – that it came from the pen of a 2 star Michelin Chef (Tom Kerridge) even better!
 This is a general take on the Tom Kerridge recipe modified just a little for cooking on the BGE which just allowed a little  smoke to be added to the overall finish!

The first thing to do was to mix up a rub for the lamb.  This comprised a 50:50 mix of lemon juice and olive oil to which was added a mix of oregano, rosemary and thyme.  If you have fresh, all the better but chop it reasonably finely, and finish off with a little salt and pepper.  The leg of lamb was brought to room temperature over an hour or so and the leg was pierces with a series of slit into which was introduced some fine slivers of a garlic clove.  (My personal precautionary note here is that in doing this, although I love garlic – when pushed into roasting lamb – less is definitely more!  This is one of the few things that my wife and I disagree about, but that is a story for another day!).

The potatoes were peeled and halved, on reflection quartering may have been even more effective but we will have to see next time,  they were then tossed in a little olive oil and dusted with dried Oregano and salt and pepper and placed round the edge of the roasting tin.  The lamb was placed in the centre and at that point the ‘rub’ was poured and spread evenly over the lamb.  At this point the whole thing could be cooked in a domestic oven, but we wanted to add the extra flavour that we get cooking over charcoal, with a little added cherry wood to give a gentle smoky flavour.  So whilst the lamb was coming to room temperature the BGE was set up in indirect mode and the dome temperature set to 200C – the same temperature I would use in a domestic fan oven.
The general timings we were planning on was 40 mins for this first stage of cooking, turning the potatoes at least once during this time.  It was the next step, at this stage that had surprised me – but rest assured it works!  At this point 125ml of chicken stock was added, stirred through the meat juices and oil and spooned over the potatoes.  The BGE was closed and left to cook for another 30 mins or so until meat reached an internal temperature of 54-55C.  At this point we removed the lamb and wrapped in foil and covered with a clean tea towel to rest.  Whilst resting, the internal temperature of the joint will continue to rise by up to 5C. 60-65C is medium.  The potatoes were tossed again in the remaining juices and then placed in a domestic oven at 50C to keep warm.

When ready to eat, the meat was thickly slices and served with the potatoes and broccoli.  The whole dish was finished off with the lemon infused cooking juices spooned over the meat.

The whole meal was great, simple one pan cooking at it’s best.  …………. do give it a go!

 

 

Greek lamb and lemon roasted potatoes

February 27, 2019
: 6
: 40 min
: 1 hr 40 min
: 2 hr 20 min
: Straight forward

Roasted lamb leg with oregano and greek style roasted potatoes

By:

Ingredients
  • For the rub and the potatoes:
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • Equal volume of olive oil
  • Dried or fresh - oregano, rosemary, thyme chopped finely
  • Salt and pepper
  • Leg of lamb
  • Clove of garlic
  • 1Kg Potatoes peeled and halved
Directions
  • Step 1 Mix up a rub for the lamb comprising a 50:50 mix of lemon juice and olive oil. Add a mix of oregano, rosemary and thyme, fresh or dried, chopped finely. Add salt and pepper
  • Step 2 Bring the leg of lamb to room temperature over a period of an hour or so. Pierces with a series of slit and introduce some fine slivers of a garlic clove.  
  • Step 3 Peel the potatoes and halve or quarter if large. Toss in a little olive oil and dust with dried Oregano and salt and pepper and place round the edge of the roasting tin.  Put the lamb in the centre of the roasting tin and pour the ‘rub’ over the lamb and spread evenly.  
  • Step 4 Cook in a domestic oven at 200C fans for that traditional cast set up the BGE in indirect mode with a dome temperature of 200C
  • Step 5 Cook for around 40 mins, turning the potatoes at least once during this time.  Add 125ml of chicken stock and stir through the meat juices and oil and spoon over the potatoes. Close the BGE and leave for another 30 mins or so until meat reached an internal temperature of 54-55C (for medium).  At this point remove the lamb and wrap in foil and cover with a clean tea towel to rest.  
  • Step 6 Toss the potatoes in the remaining juices and then placed in a domestic oven at 50C to keep warm.
  • Step 7 When ready to eat, slice the meat thickly and served with the potatoes and a vegetable.  Finish off by spooning the lemon infused cooking juices over the meat.

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